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May 7, 2021


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All the New York water news as it happens!

TOP STORY

The Interview...


BREAKING NEWS

Following major flooding events, construction to begin on state-led project in Cape Vincent Full article

Governor Cuomo Announces Groundbreaking of Resiliency Project in Jefferson County Full article

Spring river flood potential slightly above average for portions of NYS Full article

$15 Million in Grants for Homeowners to Replace Aging Septic Systems Full article





INVESTIGATIVE



CONNECTING WITH WATER

Two men looking to change the narrative around water to what nature intended. ➤



IN FOCUS

New York's Aging Infrastucture

The conservative cost estimate of repairing, replacing, and updating New York's drinking water infrastructure is $38.7 billion over the next 20 years. In 1996, the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) was created by the federal and New York State governments to provide low interest loans and grants for water system improvement projects.

In New York State there are approximately 10,147 regulated water systems (3,312 community water systems, 6,080 non-community transient water systems, and 755 non-transient non-community water systems), serving a population of approximately 18.2 million people. These figures do not include the significant number of private residential wells being utilized throughout the state.

Many of the systems mentioned above, including New York City, are nearing or have already exceeded 100 years of age and still utilize some of their original drinking water infrastructure. Various water system components have life cycles which can range from 20 years (pumps, filter media, etc.) to 50 years (storage tanks, treatment plants) to over 100 years (transmission and distribution mains). Climate related factors including snow load, ice formation and freeze/thaw cycles can significantly shorten the useful life of certain water system components.

New York State is home to some of the oldest continuously settled communities in North America, and some of the water infrastructure is nearly as old. Many of New York’s water system assets are near or past their suggested useful lives. Water mains that carry water throughout the system, transmission lines to specific users, and the pump tanks and treatment facilities are susceptible to deterioration, leading to long-term – sometimes substantial – water loss from leaks, but more commonly evidenced by water main breaks.

New York State is home to some of the oldest continuously settled communities in North America, and some of the water infrastructure is nearly as old. Many of New York’s water system assets are near or past their suggested useful lives. Water mains that carry water throughout the system, transmission lines to specific users, and the pump tanks and treatment facilities are susceptible to deterioration, leading to long-term – sometimes substantial – water loss from leaks, but more commonly evidenced by water main breaks.

The City of New York’s water system is the prime example. It has components that date from the mid-nineteenth century and has become very large and complex. It supplies about one billion gallons of water per day to nine million customers through a system of dams, reservoirs, aqueducts, water tunnels and approximately 6,700 miles of water mains.







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